Summary

Many journalists, at some point in their careers, have had an “Ah-hah!” moment -- a sudden realization about the impact of their work or the work of their colleagues. Many of the journalists interviewed for the WNN report provided a single anecdote about an event that helped them understand and appreciate the power and purpose of journalism. We are sharing those epiphanies here.

Click on the photos to view each anecdote.

Interviews 21 - 30 of 104 BACK  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  NEXT Page size:  10 | 20 | 50
Ephiphany photo

Dolph C. Simons Jr.

Chairman, The World Company; Editor, Lawrence Journal-World, Lawrence Journal-World
Lawrence, KS

Dolph Simons realized the importance of the newspaper business on a quiet Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941. He was a 7-year-old at his grandfather’s house for Sunday dinner when war broke out. Before the day was done he was on the streets of Lawrence, Kan., hawking an extra edition of his grandfather’s Lawrence Journal-World.

Ephiphany photo

Tom Rosenstiel

Director, Project for Excellence in Journalism, Project for Excellence in Journalism
Washington, D.C.

Tom Rosenstiel’s first epiphany came when his new high school newspaper seized a mandate to write the news “the way they want to write it.” The authorities objected, and Rosenstiel discovered lessons were being taught at School Board meetings as well as in the classroom.

Ephiphany photo

Duffy Hayes

Web Editor, Daily Sentinel
Grand Junction, CO

Duffy Hayes says he has learned that newspapers are “the prism though which people see the community.” And when he was a reporter, he says, “I just felt like I was making that connection [to the community] every day.”

Ephiphany photo

Laurena Mayne Davis

Managing Editor, Daily Sentinel
Grand Junction, CO

Laurena Mayne Davis was an advisor for a college student newspaper when she saw her young editor pressured for investigating the University’s Board of Trustees. The editor kept fighting, got her story out, and Davis learned a lesson: “If you do things for the right reason and stick to your guns – the right information can come out.”

Ephiphany photo

Jay Seaton

Publisher, Daily Sentinel
Grand Junction, CO

Jay Seaton’s “ah-ha” moment came when a regional sports blogger published an exclusive report on the appointment of a new football coach at Kansas State. “The newspapers did not go with it,” says Seaton, because they could not confirm it. “It was just not true,” says Seaton. “It demonstrated to me what we can do to continue to be the most important voice in the community.”

Ephiphany photo

Thomas Dewell

Co-Editor, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Jackson Hole Daily
Jackson Hole, Wy

Thomas Dewell was a young court reporter when a woman made him a jaw-dropping offer he elected to refuse. The incident helped him realize the size of the stakes when you report on people’s lives.

Ephiphany photo

Kevin Olson

Associate Publisher, Jackson Hole News & Guide, Jackson Hole Daily
Jackson Hole, Wy

The Jackson Hole News & Guide, The Jackson Hole Daily (3:30) Kevin Olson’s “ah-ha” moment came when he was working at the Orange County Register in Anaheim, Calif. When The Register told the story of its community at the beginning of the 21st Century, Olson discovered the importance of a newspaper reporting the stories of the successes and failures of a community to get the public engaged and excited about the place in which they live.

Ephiphany photo

Michael Becker

Web Editor, Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Bozeman, MT

Michael Becker was convinced that citizen journalism was fated to be “the wave of the future” until he closely watched the coverage of a gas explosion in downtown Bozeman, Mont., in March 2009. Twitter feeds flowed through the day, but Becker says when he saw the next morning’s Bozeman Daily Chronicle he realized “it takes a newspaper – or at least paid journalists – to do the best job.”

Ephiphany photo

Nick Ehli

Managing Editor, Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Bozeman, MT

Nick Ehli was a young reporter in Billings, Mont., when he decided to do a story about six-man football in the tiny community of Custer, Mont. He enjoyed writing the story, but was deeply touched when he learned how his reporting affected a tough rancher near that small Montana town.

Ephiphany photo

Mike Patrick

Managing Editor, Coeur d'Alene Press
Coeur d'Alene, ID

Mike Patrick was a young editor in his small, Illinois hometown when he learned that, even in familiar surroundings, a newspaperman can never “take anything for granted.”

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